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Dungeonopoly

Dungeonopoly is a horrific Monopoly/D&D crossbreed. The game is an extension of Monopoly, played with the same basic rules. However, each character on the board takes on a classic D&D class, and uses her powers to thwart her enemies.


Contents


Introduction and basic rules

Dungeonopoly utilizes all the normal Monopoly rules, with additional rules described below. Before you begin, be certain you are familiar with the regular Monopoly rules. Familiarity with the D&D 3rd edition rule set is also useful, but not required.

The following additional basic rules are in effect when playing Dungeonopoly:

  1. When landing on GO, collect $400 instead of the normal $200—even if due to the “Advance to GO” card.

  2. When paying a fee such as a Chance or Community Chest penalty, Income Tax, Luxury Tax, or the $50 jail fee, place the money in the “central pot” in the center of the board. Anyone landing on “Free Parking” collects this money.

  3. Players may purchase houses and hotels only during their own turns. They may sell houses and hotels, and mortgage property, only during their own turns, or when forced to raise additional cash. These limits avoid many problems, exploits and ambiguities surrounding off-turn transactions.

  4. Each player needs a d20 and a pewter figurine of her character to play.

  5. Each player chooses a character class from those described below. Multiclassing is not allowed.

  6. Characters begin play as level 1 of their chosen class, and character levels range from 1 through 10.

  7. For every 10 EP gained, a new level is achieved.

  8. Characters gain 1 EP for each of the following:
    • Purchasing property from the bank
    • Paying rent on an opponent’s property
    • Successfully using a class ability
    • Rolling doubles
    • Rolling 7 (“lucky seven”)
    • Collecting money from passing, or landing on, GO
  9. When one character damages another, the defender pays the bank $20 times the level of the attacker. If the defender has insufficient cash on hand, she must pursue all the usual channels to pay her debt. If she still cannot pay, she is bankrupt.

  10. There are a few technical terms which help to describe abilities succinctly:
    • Single use only” - These abilities may only be used once each time around the board. Passing GO clears these abilities for another use.
    • Limited range” - These abilities can target a nearby character on the same square or up to some number of squares away in either direction. The level of the user determines the maximum distance as follows: 1-2 = 1 square, 3-4 = 2 squares, 5-6 = 3 squares, 7-8 = 4 squares, 9-10 = 5 squares.
    • Line of sight” - These abilities can target a character on the same edge of the board. If the user is on a corner square, she counts as on both adjoining edges.
    • Enchantment effect” - These abilities leave a lasting impression which can be targeted by certain other abilities such as Counterspell.
    • Mental effect” - These abilities target a character’s mind. Certain characters (e.g., Ascended clerics) are immune to such effects.
    • Hidden” - A hidden character is immune to spells and abilities that target her. Thus, she cannot be attacked, nor can she be affected by Magic Missile, Charm Person, Telekinesis or Holy Smite, although Fireball would still damage her since it does not target her specifically.
  11. Spellcasting has a few special rules:
    • Unless otherwise noted, spells are single use only. Spells without this limitation are called cantrips.
    • Unless otherwise noted, spells can be cast either before or after moving, but only one spell can be cast per turn, even if doubles are rolled. If casting before moving, the spell must be cast before rolling dice for movement. Casting between movement rolls (if doubles are rolled) is allowed, but casting on the way to jail—e.g., after rolling doubles for the third time—is not.
    • Some spells have specific conditions which allow them to be cast during another character’s turn; such castings do not count toward the one spell per turn limit.
  12. “In jail” is a special square. A character in jail does not collect rent on her properties. Two people in jail do not count as being on the same square, or even on the same edge of the board—each character is in an isolated cell. Spellcasting in jail is not allowed, nor is casting a spell at someone who is in jail—the cells have antimagic fields. Thus, a fighter cannot use Far Shot on anyone from within the jail, nor can she use it to hit someone who is in jail. Someone in jail is also safe from the fighter’s Combat Reflexes ability, as well as from spells such as Telekinesis and Holy Smite.


Core classes

The following four classes comprise the core of the Dungeonopoly rule set. Any additional classes introduced should be balanced against the capabilities of the core classes.


Fighter

Fighters excel at dealing damage, debilitating their opponents’ properties and strengthening their own.

Fighter abilities

At level 1, the fighter begins with the “Attack” ability. When on the same square as an opponent, either before or after moving, the fighter may damage that opponent.

At level 2, the fighter gains the “Run” ability. Before her first movement roll of the turn, the fighter may choose to run, granting her an extra 1d6 of movement. For the purposes of determining doubles, roll the usual 2d6 first, then the extra 1d6—or use color-coded dice. If the fighter chooses to run, she cannot use any other class abilities during that turn.

At level 3, the fighter gains the “Far Shot” ability. Once per turn, either before or after moving, she can invoke this ability to damage an opponent at least one square away within line of sight. The shot can miss, however—chance of success is 10% per level. If the shot misses, no EP is earned for its use.

At level 4, the fighter gains the “Intimidate” ability. Whenever she owes rent, she may attempt to intimidate the landlord so that she does not have to pay. To do so, she must roll her level or less on a d20. If she fails, she does not earn EP for using the ability and she must pay rent normally.

At level 5, the fighter can use “Combat Reflexes” to attack (and therefore damage) an opponent as she passes that opponent while moving on her turn. That is, she no longer needs to land on the same square as her opponent to attack.

At level 6, the fighter can “Raze” enemy buildings. Whenever she lands on an opponent’s property with one or more houses, she automatically destroys one of the houses. Hotels are immune to razing.

At level 7, the fighter can “Fortify” her own property. Whenever she lands on her own property, she can add a house, to a maximum of four. Four houses cannot be fortified into a hotel, and the fighter cannot purchase a property and fortify it on the same turn—that is, it must be her when she lands on it. Mortgaged properties cannot be fortified. The fighter need not have a monopoly to fortify a given property.

At level 8, the fighter can “Conquer” opponents’ property. Whenever she lands on an opponent’s mortgaged property, she may choose to gain control of it—i.e., transfer the title to her. As usual when a mortgaged property changes hands, she must either pay to unmortgage the property on the spot (110% of the mortgage value) or pay a 10% transfer fee and leave the property mortgaged.

At level 9, the fighter gains “Veteran” status. When damaged, she pays half the usual amount. This is an automatic effect which does not award EP.

At level 10, the fighter gains the “Abundant Step” ability. Instead of rolling for movement, she may choose to move forward one to four squares. This ability is single use only. The fighter does not count as passing over any squares that get crossed, although she does count as having landed on the destination square. The fighter cannot use “Combat Reflexes” while using Abundant Step, nor can she use “Far Shot” unless it is following a normal move that same turn (which can only happen when doubles are rolled).

Fighter tactics


Wizard

Wizards have a variety of useful spells in their arsenal.

Wizard abilities

Wizards begin play with one spell, and obtain another spell each time they gain a level.

At level 1, the wizard begins with “Magic Missile.” This spell damages an opponent within limited range. Magic Missile is a cantrip.

At level 2, the wizard learns “Expeditious Retreat.” Before a movement roll, she may cast this spell to double the results of the next movement roll this turn.

At level 3, the wizard learns “Mage Armor.” After casting this spell she is protected, and does not take damage the next time she normally would. Mage Armor cannot be stacked—that is, casting it twice does not protect from the next two attacks. Mage Armor is an enchantment effect.

At level 4, the wizard learns “Slow.” This spell slows a character within limited range. The next time that character rolls for movement, she rolls only 1d6 instead of 2d6. A slowed fighter who runs rolls only 2d6 instead of 3d6, and since one of these dice is an “extra” die, the fighter cannot roll doubles or lucky seven. A slowed rogue who sneaks moves only half as far—1 square on a roll of 1 or 2, 2 squares on a roll of 3 or 4, or 3 squares on a roll of 5 or 6. Slow is an enchantment effect.

At level 5, the wizard learns “Invisibility.” She may cast this spell to become unseen. During any subsequent movement that turn, she does not count as passing over or landing on any squares—his figurine moves, but there are no consequences to the move: she owes no rent, collects no money from passing GO, etc. Until her next turn, the wizard is considered hidden. Invisibility is an enchantment effect.

At level 6, the wizard learns “Charm Person.” This spell charms an opponent within limited range. The next time the wizard owes rent money to that opponent, the opponent must waive the fee. Charm Person is a mental enchantment effect.

At level 7, the wizard learns “Counterspell.” This spell dispels an enchantment within limited range. Thus, the wizard could use it to dispel Bless or Curse from the current property, Charm Person from herself, Mage Armor or Shield of Faith from an opponent on the same square, etc.

Alternately, she can cast Counterspell to cancel out a spell being cast by another character anywhere on the board.

Note that Counterspell targets spells and enchantments, not the character casting them—hence, a cleric with Shield of Faith active can still have her spells countered, and a cleric protected by Sanctuary can have the Sanctuary dispelled.

At level 8, the wizard learns “Fireball.” When cast, all houses and hotels on the current square are destroyed, unless the property is blessed. In addition, all opponents on that square take damage. If rent is owed, payment must be made before the buildings are destroyed.

At level 9, the wizard learns “Telekinesis.” Any character on the board may be targeted, including the wizard herself. The targeted character moves between one and five squares, either forward or backward. The character does count as passing over any squares that get crossed—so passing GO and collecting $200 due to Telekinesis is possible. However, the character does not count as having landed on the final square. Thus, using Telekinesis to push an opponent three spaces back onto a property with a hotel does not cause that opponent to owe rent for that property. In the case of landing on GO with telekinesis, collect $200 for “passing” GO but not the extra $200 for landing on it.

At level 10, the wizard learns “Wish.” She can cast it to perform one of the following actions:

Wizard tactics


Cleric

The cleric is chosen by the gods, granted holy powers and blessings.

Cleric abilities

Clerics begin play with one spell, and obtain other spells and powers as they advance in level.

At level 1, the cleric begins play with the “Bless” spell. When cast, the current property becomes blessed, yielding an additional 5% rent per level of the cleric, rounded down. Hence, a property normally yielding $650 in rent would bring in $747 if blessed by a level 3 cleric. In addition, a blessed property is immune to effects that destroy buildings, such as the wizard’s “Fireball” and the fighter’s “Raze.” If cast on a cursed land, Bless simply dispels the curse. Bless is an enchantment effect and has a $50 casting cost.

Alternately, the cleric can invert the spell and cast it as a “Curse.” When cast, the current property becomes cursed, yielding 5% less rent per level of the cleric, rounded up. Hence, a property normally yielding $650 in rent would bring in $553 if cursed by a level 3 cleric. If cast on a blessed land, Curse simply dispels the blessing. Curse is an enchantment effect and has a $50 casting cost

At level 2, the cleric learns the “Shield of Faith” spell. After casting this spell, she is protected. The next time someone either damages her or casts a spell at her (e.g., Magic Missile, Charm Person or Telekinesis) she is unaffected. Shield of Faith cannot be stacked—that is, casting it twice does not protect from the next two attacks or spells. Shield of Faith is an enchantment effect.

At level 3, the cleric learns the “Sanctuary” spell. After casting the spell, the cleric is invulnerable until her next turn. She cannot be targeted by any class abilities, nor can she take damage. If cast before moving, the cleric forfeits her movement roll. Sanctuary is an enchantment effect.

At level 4, the cleric gains a new power, “Divine Favor.” She no longer needs to pay most fees. She can ignore Luxury Tax and Income Tax payments, as well as choose whether to accept the consequences of any Community Chest and Chance cards she draws. However, she still pays the $50 jail fee to get out of jail. This is an automatic effect which does not award EP.

At level 5, the cleric learns the “Holy Smite” spell. When cast, it damages an opponent, regardless of her position on the board—although it cannot be used to damage someone in jail.

At level 6, the cleric learns the “Divine Intervention” spell. Any time dice are rolled, she can cast this spell to discard the result and require a reroll. If she casts this spell to reroll a roll during her own turn, it counts toward the one spell per turn limit.

At level 7, the cleric gains a new power, “Divine Power.” Whenever she passes a Chance or Community Chest square, she draws the card. Divine Favor applies as usual for choosing whether to accept each card. If the card is a movement card (e.g., “Advance to GO”) and the cleric accepts it, movement occurs from the associated Chance or Community Chest square, and the remainder of the cleric’s movement roll is discarded.

In addition, whenever she passes the Free Parking square, she collects the money from the central pot—she no longer needs to land on the square.

This is an automatic effect which does not award EP.

At level 8, the cleric learns the “Glyph of Warding” spell. Casting this spell leaves behind a glyph on the current property. The next character to pass over the property with the glyph stops on that square, forfeiting any remaining movement—treat it as though the character landed on that square. In addition, the affected character takes damage. In the case of a character being moved with Telekinesis over a glyph, the character still does not count as landing on the square. Glyph of Warding is an enchantment effect and has a $150 casting cost.

At level 9, the cleric gains “Ascended” status. She is immune to mental effects (e.g., Charm Person), as well as any effect that would send her to jail. In the case of three consecutive doubles rolls, the cleric moves the result of the third roll but does not roll a fourth time. This is an automatic effect which does not award EP.

At level 10, the cleric learns the “Wrath of God” spell. When cast, all opponents are damaged—even hidden ones. Furthermore, all opponents’ properties lose one house. A property with a hotel is downgraded to four houses. Unimproved properties are unaffected. Wrath of God has a $300 casting cost.

Cleric tactics


Rogue

The rogue is wily and crafty, stealing what she needs to survive.

Rogue abilities

Rogues begin play with 30 points to distribute throughout their skills. Each time they gain a level, 5 more points become available for distribution. Because thievery always involves a degree of risk, no skill may have more than 15 ranks.

To use a skill, the rogue must pass a skill check by rolling less than or equal to her ranks in that skill on a d20. The rogue only receives EP for using the skill if she is successful.

The rogue’s skills are:

Rogue tactics


Additional classes

For those thirsty for variety, the following classes offer additional options for play.


Bard

The bard sings sweet songs, lulling her opponents into a false sense of security.

Bard abilities

At level 1, the bard learns the “Fascinate” ability. The bard makes a mesmerizing performance, pulling all characters within limited range onto her square. Characters count as passing over and landing on squares as usual. Hidden characters are affected, but still do not count as passing over or landing on squares. Each character can be affected only once per turn. Fascinate is a mental effect.

At level 2, the bard begins play the “Bardic Music” ability. The bard may activate this ability whenever a character—including the bard herself—owes rent with the bard present on that rental property. The bard performs a melody which alters details of the transaction. She begins play with one melody, chosen from the following list:

Only one melody may be used per activation of Bardic Music. In the case of multiple characters owing rent on a property simultaneously (e.g., due to the Mass Suggestion spell), the bard performs only a single bardic melody, which applies to all affected characters.

At level 3, the bard learns the “Suggestion” spell, which plants an idea within the mind of a character within limited range. Until the end of the current turn, when the bard moves, the affected character also moves that same number of squares. This movement counts as passing over and landing on squares as usual for the affected character. Suggestion is a mental effect.

At level 4, the bard learns a second Bardic Music melody, chosen from the list above.

At level 5, the bard learns the “Glitterdust” spell, which affects all characters in a single square within limited range. Hidden characters are revealed—although they do not count as landing on the square in which they appear. In addition, the next time an affected character would become hidden, the effect fizzles instead. Glitterdust is an enchantment effect.

At level 6, the bard learns a third Bardic Music melody, chosen from the list above.

At level 7, the bard gains “Bardic Knowledge”: instead of rolling, she may choose to move seven squares forward. This does not count as rolling “lucky seven” for the purposes of gaining EP. This ability is single use only.

At level 8, the bard learns a fourth Bardic Music melody, chosen from the list above.

At level 9, the bard learns the “Mass Suggestion” spell. It functions the same as Suggestion, but affects all characters within limited range, including hidden characters. However, hidden character movement still does not count as passing over or landing on squares.

At level 10, the bard gains “Jack-of-All-Trades” status, learning three abilities of level 5 or less from any combination of other class lists. The bard may select rogue skills, but each skill selected is fixed at 12 ranks.

Bard tactics


Druid

The druid is a primal avatar of natural forces.

Druid abilities

At level 1, the druid begins play with a “Primal Enchantment” spell, which enchants her current square to have a permanent special quality. Her initial primal spell is chosen from the following list:

Only one square on the board may be enchanted by each particular primal spell; enchanting a second square using the same spell moves the enchantment from the old square to the new one.

At level 2, the druid learns the “Barkskin” spell. After casting this spell, she is protected. The next time she owes money for any reason—excluding voluntary purchases such as properties or improvements thereof—she pays $25 less per level, to a minimum of $1. Barkskin cannot be stacked. Barkskin is an enchantment effect.

At level 3, the druid learns the “Wild Shape” ability. She chooses an animal form from the following list:

The druid can shift forms once per turn, either before or after moving. Shifting forms does not earn EP. While in animal form, the druid cannot cast spells—she must shift back to her normal “Humanoid” form in order to do so.

At level 4, the druid learns a second Primal Enchantment spell chosen from the list above.

At level 5, the druid learns the “Tree Stride” spell. When the druid rolls doubles, the druid can cast this spell to discard the result, instead opting to transport herself to one of her owned properties. She does not count as passing over any intervening squares, but she does count as landing on the destination square. She does not gain EP from rolling doubles (since she discarded the roll), nor does she roll again afterward.

At level 6, the druid masters a second Wild Shape animal form, chosen from the list above.

At level 7, the druid learns a third Primal Enchantment spell chosen from the list above.

At level 8, the druid learns the “Call Lightning” spell. This spell calls forth up to 7 bolts of lightning, each of which strikes a different square within limited range. For each bolt, the druid chooses whether it: A) damages an opponent on the target square; B) destroys a house on the target property; or C) mortgages the target property if it is unimproved, with no corresponding loan from the bank. If none of these three conditions is applicable to a given square, that bolt has no effect.

At level 9, the druid masters a third Wild Shape animal form, chosen from the list above.

At level 10, the druid learns the “Creeping Doom” spell. The druid’s current square, and any other properties of that same set, suffer from a terrifying insect infestation which ravages houses, hotels and characters. Opponents present at any affected property take damage. Afterward, the property owner must make repairs, paying $40 per house and $115 per hotel on that set of properties to the bank.

Druid tactics


Paladin

The paladin is a holy knight who focuses on chivalry and defense.

Paladin abilities

At level 1, the paladin learns the “Counter” ability. When the paladin takes damage from an opponent within reach, the paladin may choose to counter, damaging that opponent in response. An opponent is within reach when she is on the same square as the paladin, or on an adjacent square.

At level 2, the paladin learns the “Challenge” ability. The paladin taunts an opponent within line of sight into participating in a duel. The paladin and the opponent each ante one of their respective unimproved properties; if the opponent has no such property to ante, the ability is wasted and the paladin does not earn EP. The two properties are then immediately auctioned as a pair, with bidding only possible between the paladin and that opponent. As usual for auctions, only cash on hand may be used for bidding. For property which is mortgaged, the normal transfer fee of 10% applies as usual; the winner may also opt to pay back the mortgage as part of the transaction if desired. The winner of the auction pays the loser (not the bank). Winning the auction counts as purchasing property for the purpose of gaining EP. Challenge is a single-use ability.

At level 3, the paladin befriends a “Celestial Mount.” This noble steed offers the paladin swift travel around the board. Once per turn, the paladin may summon + mount or dismount + dismiss the horse; these actions earn EP. While mounted, each time the paladin rolls for movement, the die type used increases: the first move is at a trot and rolls 2d8; the second move is at a canter and rolls 2d10; and third and later moves are at a gallop and roll 2d12. Dismounting resets the progression back to 2d6 as usual.

At level 4, the paladin masters a “Fighting Stance.” The paladin may enter a stance only after moving, and entering one ends the paladin’s turn. The stance’s effects last until the start of the paladin’s next turn. Only one stance may be active at a time. Stances cannot be used while mounted. Entering a stance earns EP.

She chooses one of the following stances:

At level 5, the paladin learns the “Knight’s Move” ability. Either before or after moving, the paladin maneuvers a character—either herself or an opponent within line of sight—three squares either forward or backward. This movement does not count as passing over the intervening squares, but does count as landing on the destination square. This ability is single use only.

At level 6, the paladin gains a new blessing, “Divine Grace.” When the paladin rolls doubles, she is surrounded by an aura of protection. Until the end of her current turn, she is invulnerable, ignoring all damage, fees and rental payments.

At level 7, the paladin gains a new blessing, “Holy Aura.” Any time an opponent, even a hidden one, starts her turn within the paladin’s reach, that opponent takes damage.

At level 8, the paladin masters a second stance from those listed above. Only one stance may be active at a time.

At level 9, the paladin gains a new blessing, “Heart of the Titan.” She sets aside $500 from the bank into an isolated reservoir. This money forms a “buffer” against damage which is spent before the paladin’s own funds whenever she takes damage. The fund is replenished whenever the paladin passes GO. This is an automatic effect which does not award EP.

At level 10, the paladin gains a new blessing, “Holy Sword.” The paladin’s reach increases to two squares away.

Paladin tactics


Psion

The psion manipulates her enemies with barrages of mental energy.

Psion abilities

Psions manifest mental powers by spending power points (PP). A psion has a number of PP equal to her level. Passing GO refills the psion’s available PP.

As with spells, powers may be manifested either before or after moving, and only one power can be manifested per turn, even if doubles are rolled. Unlike spells, however, each power can be used more than once each time around the board, provided the psion has sufficient PP to do so.

Some powers are manifested defensively, in response to some triggering event. These powers are immediate responses which do not count toward the one power per turn limit.

For any psionic power affecting targets within limited range, the psion may choose to augment the reach of the power: for each additional PP spent in this manner, that manifestation affects targets one square further away.

At level 1, the psion begins play with the “Mind Thrust” power. The psion delivers an assault on the thought pathways of an opponent within limited range. The opponent suffers mental damage according to the following table:

PP spent Amount
1 $10
2 $30
3 $60
4 $100
5 $150
6 $210
7 $280
8 $360
9 $450
10 $550

At level 2, the psion learns the “Empty Mind” power. The psion floats in an expanse of vacuous conception, emptying her mind of all transitory and distracting thoughts. In response to owing money, the amount owed is reduced according to the table given above. Empty Mind is a defensive power.

At level 3, the psion learns the “Ego Whip” power. The psion’s rapid mental lashings assault the ego of an opponent within limited range. The opponent is dazed: the next time she rolls for movement, the movement is forfeit. She moves no squares, and counts as landing on her current square again. Ego Whip is a mental enchantment effect, which costs 2 PP to manifest.

At level 4, the psion learns the “Modify Memory” power. The psion reaches into the mind of an opponent within limited range, manipulating her memories. Control of the opponent’s least expensive property, including any improvements, transfers to the psion.

Each time someone owes rent on the property, the original owner rolls a d20: if she rolls her level or less, she remembers the truth, breaking the enchantment and regaining control of the property, including for the triggering transaction.

Modify Memory cannot be stacked—that is, casting it twice on the same opponent has no additional effect. Modify Memory is a mental enchantment effect, which costs 2 PP to manifest.

At level 5, the psion learns the “Thought Leech” power. The psion’s brow erupts with an arc of crackling dark energy that connects with an opponent within limited range. For every 3 PP spent, an enchantment currently affecting the target opponent transfers to the psion, affecting her instead.

At level 6, the psion learns the “Id Insinuation” power. Tendrils of thought disrupt an opponent’s unconscious mind, slicing through her mental defenses. The opponent is confused: the next time she rolls for movement, she moves backwards around the board instead of forwards. She counts as passing over and landing on squares as normal. Id Insinuation is a mental enchantment effect, which costs 3 PP to manifest.

At level 7, the psion learns the “Genesis” power. A local density fluctuation precipitates the creation of a unique demiplane between two adjacent squares of the board within limited range. The psion chooses a card from the discard pile of either Community Chest or Chance, placing it under the edge of the board between the two adjacent squares. The chosen card is not returned to the deck—even for shuffling—unless the demiplane is dispelled.

The card becomes a quasi-real, polarized square on the board: Community Chest demiplanes exist only for the psion, whereas Chance demiplanes exist only for opponents.

Genesis may only create one demiplane between each pair of adjacent squares, and only between two real non-demiplane squares. If a demiplane already exists between the two chosen squares, the existing one collapses in favor of the new one. Genesis is an enchantment effect which costs 4 PP + $40 to manifest.

At level 8, the psion learns the “Psionic Blast” power. The air ripples with mental force, blasting all opponents within limited range. All opponents are pushed to the square just outside of the affected range. Similar to the wizard’s “Telekinesis” spell, opponents do count as passing over any squares that get crossed; however, the characters do not count as having landed on the final square. Psionic Blast costs 4 PP to manifest.

At level 9, the psion learns the “Intellect Fortress” power. The psion encases all characters within limited range—including herself—in a shimmering fortress of telekinetic force and determination. Intellect Fortress is a defensive power which costs 5 PP to manifest: the psion may use it in response to any character within range being affected by any ability. All characters within the fortress are unaffected by the triggering ability.

At level 10, the psion learns the “Psychic Crush” power. The psion’s will crushes the mental essence of an opponent anywhere on the board. The opponent is returned to GO. The opponent does not collect $200, or enjoy any other of the usual benefits of passing GO. Psychic Crush is a mental effect, which costs 5 PP to manifest.

Psion tactics


Warlock

The warlock draws power from a sinister pact with powerful entities.

Warlock abilities

Every warlock chooses a pact: Infernal, Fey or Dark. This choice impacts her abilities as she progresses.

At level 1, the warlock learns the “Hex” ability. Once per turn, either before or after moving, the warlock can place a curse on an opponent within limited range. The next time that opponent collects money from any source, the money is instead deposited into the central pot. Once money has been redirected in this way, the character is no longer considered cursed. Hex is an enchantment effect.

At level 2, the warlock learns the “Eldritch Blast” ability. Once per turn, either before or after moving, the warlock can shoot a blast of force at a cursed opponent within limited range. The opponent takes damage.

At level 3, the warlock develops supernatural defenses. She learns a spell according to her chosen pact:

At level 4, the warlock’s Eldritch Blast grows stronger. Choose one of the following enhancements:

At level 5, the warlock develops supernatural fortitude. This is an automatic effect which does not award EP. She gains a trait according to her chosen pact:

At level 6, the warlock selects a second Eldritch Blast enhancement from the above list.

At level 7, the warlock learns the “Dark One’s Own Luck” ability. Before rolling 2d6 for movement, she may invoke this ability to roll 3d6 and choose which two dice to keep after seeing the results. This ability is single use only.

At level 8, the warlock selects a third Eldritch Blast enhancement from the above list.

At level 9, the warlock is granted a “Book of Shadows” containing forbidden secrets. She learns three spells of level 4 or less from any combination of other class lists.

At level 10, the warlock learns the “Crown of Madness” spell, which targets an opponent within limited range. The warlock forces the opponent to immediately use an ability of the warlock’s choice, as the warlock dictates. The warlock cannot force an opponent to cast a spell with a casting cost. For example, a warlock could force a nearby wizard to cast Fireball to destroy property improvements on the wizard’s current square, or force a nearby cleric to cast Holy Smite on an annoying bard. Crown of Madness is a mental effect with a $200 casting cost.

Warlock tactics


Advanced and alternative rules

Politics

Like normal Monopoly, Dungeonopoly can become very political. For example, a four player game can easily degenerate into a two on two game. When that happens, it not always clear what’s allowed and what’s not. Can you choose to waive the rent on one of your properties? What about reduce it? One way to cut down on the politics is to institute strict rules, so that rent must always be paid, and money and property cannot be given or traded to other players except at listed value. However, this strictness can cause problems as well, since part of the value of a trade is not represented in its listed price; for example, obtaining the third property in a set to form a monopoly is clearly more valuable than obtaining the same property without possessing the other two matching ones.

Team rules

Quicker game

Blitz game

Gestalt classes


Credits

Dungeonopoly was designed by Curtis & Kelsey Rueden, with additional suggestions from Andy Reichert, Jon Fish and others.