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Dungeonopoly

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Dungeonopoly is a horrific Monopoly/D&D crossbreed, designed by Curtis & Kelsey Rueden, with additional suggestions from Jon Fish and others. The game is an extension of Monopoly, played with the same basic rules. However, each character on the board takes on one of four classic D&D classes—fighter, mage, cleric or thief—and uses his powers to thwart his enemies.

What follows is the second revision, and corresponds to the 3.x version of D&D. Someday, we hope to create a brand new version corresponding to the 4th edition of Dungeons & Dragons.

 

1 – Introduction and basic rules

Dungeonopoly utilizes all the normal Monopoly rules, with additional rules described below. Before you begin, be certain you are familiar with the regular Monopoly rules. Familiarity with the D&D 3rd edition rule set is also useful, but not required.

The following additional basic rules are in effect when playing Dungeonopoly:

1) When landing on GO, collect $400 instead of the normal $200 (even if due to the “Advance to GO” card).

2) When paying a fee such as a Chance or Community Chest penalty, Income Tax, Luxury Tax, or the $50 jail fee, place the money in the center of the board. Anyone landing on “Free Parking” collects this money.

3) Each player needs a d20 and a pewter figurine of his character to play.

4) Character class is chosen from among fighter, mage, cleric or thief. Multiclassing is not allowed.

5) Characters begin play as level 1 of their chosen class, and character levels range from 1 through 10.

6) For every 10 EP gained, a new level is achieved.

7) Characters gain 1 EP for each of the following:

  • Purchasing property from the bank

  • Paying rent on an opponent’s property

  • Successfully using a class ability

  • Rolling doubles

  • Rolling 7 (“lucky seven”)

  • Collecting money from passing (or landing on) GO

8) When one character damages another, the defender pays $20 times the level of the attacker (to the bank). If the defender has insufficient cash on hand, he must pursue all the usual channels to pay his debt. If he still cannot pay, he is bankrupt.

9) Some abilities are “single use only.” They may only be used once each time around the board. Passing GO clears these abilities for another use.

10) All spells are single use only. Spells can be cast either before or after moving (unless otherwise noted), but only one spell can be cast per turn (even if doubles are rolled). If casting before moving, the spell must be cast before rolling dice for movement. Casting between movement rolls (if doubles are rolled) is allowed, but casting on the way to jail (e.g., after rolling doubles for the third time) is not.

11) Some spells are “limited range.” If the caster is level four or less, these spells can target a character on the same square, or up to one square away (in either direction). If the caster is between levels five and eight, they can target a character up to two squares away. If the caster is level nine or ten, they can target a character up to three squares away.

12) “In jail” is a special square. A character in jail does not collect rent on his properties. Two people in jail do not count as being on the same square, or even on the same edge of the board (each character is in a separate cell). Spellcasting in jail is not allowed, nor is casting a spell at someone who is in jail (the walls are magically shielded). Thus, a fighter cannot use Far Shot on anyone from within the jail, nor can he use it to hit someone who is in jail. Someone in jail is also safe from the fighter’s Combat Reflexes ability, as well as from spells such as Telekinesis and Holy Smite.

 


2 – The fighter class

Fighters excel at dealing damage, debilitating their opponents’ properties and strengthening their own.

At level 1, the fighter begins with the “Attack” ability. When on the same square as an opponent, either before or after moving, the fighter may damage that opponent.

At level 2, the fighter gains the “Run” ability. Before his first movement roll of the turn, the fighter may choose to run, granting him an extra 1d6 of movement. For the purposes of determining doubles, roll the usual 2d6 first, then the extra 1d6 (or use color-coded dice). If the fighter chooses to run, he cannot use any other class abilities during that turn.

At level 3, the fighter gains the “Far Shot” ability. Once per turn, either before or after moving, he can invoke this ability to damage an opponent at least one square away on the same edge of the board (if the fighter is on a corner square, he counts as on both adjoining edges). The shot can miss, however—chance of success is 10% per level. If the shot misses, no EP is earned for its use.

At level 4, the fighter gains the “Intimidate” ability. Whenever he owes rent, he may attempt to intimidate the landlord so that he does not have to pay. To do so, he must roll his level or less on a d20. If he fails, he does not earn EP for using the ability and he must pay rent normally.

At level 5, the fighter can use “Combat Reflexes” to attack (and damage) an opponent as he passes that opponent (that is, he no longer needs to land on the same square as his opponent to attack).

At level 6, the fighter can “Raze” enemy buildings. Whenever he lands on an opponent’s property with one or more houses, he automatically destroys one of the houses. Hotels are immune to razing.

At level 7, the fighter can “Fortify” his own property. Whenever he lands on his own property, he can add a house (to a maximum of four). Four houses cannot be fortified into a hotel, and the fighter cannot purchase a property and fortify it on the same turn (that is, it must be his when he lands on it). Mortgaged properties cannot be fortified. The fighter need not have a monopoly to fortify a given property.

At level 8, the fighter can “Conquer” opponents’ property. Whenever he lands on an opponent’s mortgaged property, he gains control of it (the title transfers to him). He need not pay any transfer fees, although the property remains mortgaged.

At level 9, the fighter gains “Veteran” status. When damaged, he pays half the usual amount.

At level 10, the fighter gains “Abundant Step.” Instead of rolling for movement, he may choose to move forward one to four squares. This ability is single use only. The fighter does not count as passing over any squares that get crossed, although he does count as having landed on the destination square. The fighter cannot use “Combat Reflexes” while using Abundant Step, nor can he use “Far Shot” unless it is following a normal move that same turn (which can only happen when doubles are rolled).

 


3 – The mage class

Mages have a variety of useful spells in their arsenal. Mages begin play with one spell, and obtain another spell each time they gain a level.

At level 1, the mage begins with “Magic Missile.” This spell damages an opponent within limited range.

At level 2, the mage learns “Expeditious Retreat.” Before a movement roll, he may cast this spell to double the results of the next movement roll this turn.

At level 3, the mage learns “Mage Armor.” After casting this spell he is protected, and does not take damage the next time he normally would. Mage Armor cannot be stacked (that is, casting it twice does not protect from the next two attacks).

At level 4, the mage learns “Slow.” This spell slows an opponent within limited range. The next time that opponent rolls for movement, he rolls only 1d6 instead of 2d6. A slowed fighter who runs rolls only 2d6 instead of 3d6, and since one of these dice is an “extra” die, the fighter cannot roll doubles or lucky seven. A slowed thief who sneaks moves only half as far—1 square on a roll of 1 or 2, 2 squares on a roll of 3 or 4, or 3 squares on a roll of 5 or 6.

At level 5, the mage learns “Invisibility.” Before a movement roll, he may cast this spell to become unseen. During that turn’s movement, he does not count as passing over or landing on any squares (that is, his figurine moves, but there are no consequences to the move—he owes no rent, collects no money from passing GO, etc.).

Until his next turn, the mage is considered hidden, making him immune to spells and abilities that target him. Thus, he cannot be attacked, nor can he be affected by Magic Missile, Charm Person, Telekinesis or Holy Smite, although Fireball would still damage him since it does not target him specifically.

At level 6, the mage learns “Charm Person.” This spell charms an opponent within limited range. The next time the mage owes rent money to that opponent, the opponent must waive the fee.

At level 7, the mage learns “Counterspell.” This spell dispels an enchantment on the mage’s current square. Thus, the mage could use it to dispel Bless or Curse from the current property, Charm Person from himself, Mage Armor or Shield of Faith from an opponent on the same square, etc.

Alternately, he can cast Counterspell to cancel out a spell being cast by another player anywhere on the board. Since casting in this manner happens during the opponent’s turn, it does not count toward the one spell per turn limit.

Note that Counterspell targets spells and enchantments, not the character casting them—hence, a cleric with Shield of Faith active can still have his spells countered, and a cleric protected by Sanctuary can have the Sanctuary dispelled.

At level 8, the mage learns “Fireball.” When cast, all houses and hotels on the current square are destroyed (unless the property is blessed). In addition, all opponents on that square take damage. If rent is owed, payment must be made before the buildings are destroyed.

 

At level 9, the mage learns “Telekinesis.” Any character on the board may be targeted (including the mage himself). The targeted character moves between one and five squares, either forward or backward. In the case of forward motion, the character does count as passing over any squares that get crossed (so passing GO and collecting $200 due to Telekinesis is possible). However, the character does not count as having landed on the final square. Thus, using Telekinesis to push an opponent three spaces back onto a property with a hotel does not cause that opponent to owe rent for that property. In the case of landing on GO with telekinesis, collect $200 for “passing” GO but not the extra $200 for landing on it.

At level 10, the mage learns “Wish.” He can cast it to duplicate the effects of any other spell (mage or cleric). Alternatively, when the current square is already owned, the mage may use Wish to place a hotel on the property, even if it is not part of a monopoly. Wish has a $500 casting cost.

 


4 – The cleric class

The cleric is chosen by the gods, granted holy powers and blessings. Clerics begin play with one spell, and obtain other spells and powers as they advance in level.

At level 1, the cleric begins play with the “Bless” spell. When cast, the current property becomes blessed, yielding an additional 5% rent per level of the cleric (rounded down). Hence, a property normally yielding $650 in rent would bring in $747 if blessed by a level 3 cleric. In addition, a blessed property is immune to effects that destroy buildings, such as the mage’s “Fireball” and the fighter’s “Raze.” If cast on a cursed land, Bless simply dispels the curse. Bless has a $50 casting cost.

Alternately, the cleric can invert the spell and cast it as a “Curse.” When cast, the current property becomes cursed, yielding 5% less rent per level of the cleric (rounded up). Hence, a property normally yielding $650 in rent would bring in $553 if cursed by a level 3 cleric. If cast on a blessed land, Curse simply dispels the blessing. Curse has a $50 casting cost

At level 2, the cleric learns the “Shield of Faith” spell. After casting this spell, he is protected. The next time someone either damages him or casts a spell at him (e.g., Magic Missile, Charm Person, Telekinesis, etc.) he is unaffected. Shield of Faith cannot be stacked (that is, casting it twice does not protect from the next two attacks or spells).

At level 3, the cleric learns the “Sanctuary” spell. After casting the spell, the cleric is invulnerable until his next turn. He cannot be targeted by any class abilities, nor can he take damage. If cast before moving, the cleric forfeits his movement roll.

At level 4, the cleric gains a new power, “Divine Favor.” He no longer needs to pay most fees. He can ignore Luxury Tax and Income Tax payments, as well as choose whether to accept the consequences of any Community Chest and Chance cards he draws. However, he still pays the $50 jail fee to get out of jail.

At level 5, the cleric learns the “Holy Smite” spell. When cast, it damages an opponent, regardless of his position on the board (although it cannot be used to damage someone in jail).

At level 6, the cleric learns the “Divine Intervention” spell. Any time dice are rolled, he can cast this spell to discard the result and require a reroll. If he casts this spell to reroll one of his own rolls (during his own turn), it counts toward the one spell per turn limit.

At level 7, the cleric gains a new power, “Divine Power.” Whenever he passes a Chance or Community Chest square, he draws the card (Divine Favor still applies for choosing whether to accept each card). If the card is a movement card (e.g., “Advance to GO”) and the cleric accepts it, movement occurs from the associated Chance or Community Chest square, and the remainder of the cleric’s movement roll is discarded.

In addition, whenever he passes the Free Parking square, he collects the money from the central pot (he no longer needs to land on the square).

At level 8, the cleric learns a new spell, “Glyph of Warding.” Casting this spell leaves behind a glyph on the current property. The next character to pass over the property with the glyph stops on that square, forfeiting any remaining movement (treat it as though the character landed on that square). In addition, the affected character takes damage. In the case of a character being moved with Telekinesis over a glyph, the character still does not count as landing on the square. Glyph of Warding has a $150 casting cost.

At level 9, the cleric gains “Ascended” status. He is immune to any effect that would send him to jail, and he also cannot be affected by the mage’s “Charm Person” spell. In the case of three consecutive doubles rolls, the cleric moves the result of the third roll but does not roll a fourth time.

At level 10, the cleric learns a new spell, “Wrath of God.” When cast, all opponents are damaged (even hidden ones), and all opponents’ properties lose one house (a property with a hotel is downgraded to four houses). Unimproved properties are unaffected. Wrath of God has a $300 casting cost.

 


5 – The thief class

The thief is wily and crafty, stealing what he needs to survive. Thieves begin play with 26 points to distribute throughout their five skills. Each time they gain a level, 6 more points become available for distribution. Because thievery always involves a degree of risk, no skill may have more than 16 ranks.

To use a skill, the thief must pass a skill check by rolling less than or equal to his ranks in that skill on a d20. The thief only receives EP for using the skill if he is successful.

Open Locks” is the skill for escaping jail. When in jail, the thief can use this skill to leave without paying the usual $50. He can attempt to escape on the same turn he is imprisoned, as well as at the beginning of any subsequent turn. He can also use this skill to release other characters from jail when he is on the Just Visiting square. A separate skill check is required for each character to be released. Only one attempt can be made per character each turn.

Pick Pockets” is the skill for stealing money from other characters. Whenever the thief is on the same square as another character, he can use this skill to attempt to pick the pockets of that character. If successful, he takes $20 per thief level from the opponent’s cash on hand. If the opponent has insufficient cash on hand, the thief simply takes what he can get. If he fails the skill roll, the thief goes to jail. The thief can also use this skill on an opponent while sneaking past (see the Sneak skill below). Only one attempt can be made per character each turn.

Rob Bank” is the skill for stealing money from the bank. When the thief passes GO, he can attempt to obtain additional money using this skill. If successful, he takes an extra $50 per level (when landing on GO, success yields an extra $100 per level). If he fails, however, he forfeits his entire GO bonus and goes to jail.

Sneak” is the skill for moving stealthily. Instead of rolling movement normally, the thief can opt to sneak with a successful skill check. He rolls only 1d6 for movement. During that move, he does not count as passing over or landing on any squares (that is, his figurine moves, but there are no consequences to the move—he owes no rent, collects no money from passing GO, etc.).

While sneaking past an opponent, he may choose to Backstab that opponent, damaging him and earning an additional EP. He may also pick the opponent’s pockets if desired, although he faces the usual penalties for failure (see the Pick Pockets skill above).

After sneaking, a thief is considered hidden until his next turn, making him immune to spells and abilities that target him. Thus, he cannot be attacked, nor can he be affected by Magic Missile, Charm Person, Telekinesis or Holy Smite, although Fireball would still damage him since it does not target him specifically.

Lastly, after moving, he may choose not to hide, so that he still counts as having landed on the current property. If the thief “comes out of sneak” in this fashion, he must face all normal consequences of landing on the current property, and he does not receive the benefits of being hidden until his next turn as described above.

Steal” is the skill for robbing property of valuables. When on a property with at least one house, the thief may use this skill to loot the place, stealing 5% of the property’s rent per level (rounded down). The thief receives this money from the property owner, who must take all the usual actions to generate enough money (or else he goes bankrupt). If the thief fails his skill roll, he must pay rent on the property normally if he has not done so already, then go to jail.

 


6 – Advanced and alternative rules


Politics

Dungeonopoly can become very political. For example, a four player game can easily degenerate into a two on two game. When that happens, it not always clear what’s allowed and what’s not. Can you choose to waive the rent on one of your properties? What about reduce it? One way to cut down on the politics is to institute strict rules, so that rent must always be paid, and money and property cannot be given or traded to other players except at listed value. However, this strictness can cause problems as well, since part of the value of a trade is not represented in its listed price (for example, obtaining the third property in a set to form a monopoly is clearly more valuable than obtaining the same property without possessing the other two matching ones).


Team rules

  • Multiple players work together to bankrupt the other teams

  • Team members share one pool of cash on hand, and one collection of properties

  • Combine class skills to reach new heights of brokenness!

  • Play a quicker or blitz team game using the rules below


Quicker game

  • 5 EP per level

  • Double all fees (damage, Community Chest/Chance, jail, etc.)

  • Cut all gains in half (Pick Pockets, Community Chest/Chance, etc.)


Blitz game

  • Before the game starts, players take turns choosing one property at a time until all are taken

  • Characters begin play at level 10

 


7 – Tactics and strategies


Fighter

  • Use Run often as soon as you learn it. You’ll earn EP quickly, and pass GO often.

  • Don’t forget about Intimidate! Having rent fees waived often is extremely valuable.

  • Use both Combat Reflexes and Far Shot to damage someone with Mage Armor or Shield of Faith active.

  • Once you learn Abundant Step, use it in combination with the tactical abilities Raze, Fortify and Conquer.


Mage

  • Use Expeditious Retreat often as soon as you learn it. You’ll pass GO more quickly.

  • To protect yourself against enemies, especially the brutal fighter, have Mage Armor active whenever possible. If a fighter is continually hassling you, control your movement with Expeditious Retreat or Slow to escape him, or use Invisibility to hide from him.

  • Use Slow on an opponent nearing your improved properties, to increase his chances of landing there. Or, use it on yourself when nearing a desirable square such as Free Parking, GO or Boardwalk.

  • Control your movement through enemy properties with Expeditious Retreat, Slow and Telekinesis.

  • Use Invisibility to avoid paying rent on particularly devastating improved properties.

  • Keep all your opponents charmed whenever possible.

  • Use Counterspell, Fireball and Wish to make deals with opponents. Threaten to destroy all their houses, offer to dispel an enemy Curse, or even place a hotel on their property, in exchange for money, property or services.

  • Use Telekinesis to maneuver an opponent to a location with the greatest chance of landing on your improved properties (seven squares away is statistically most likely).

  • Learn cleric strategies as well, since Wish can duplicate any cleric spell.


Cleric

  • Use Bless/Curse to make deals with opponents. Offer them the chance to get their property blessed for a fee, or threaten to curse their property if they won’t meet your demands.

  • To stay protected from your enemies, especially the brutal fighter, have Shield of Faith active whenever possible. If a fighter is continually hassling you, use Sanctuary before your movement to protect yourself, and to increase the likelihood of him passing you.

  • Don’t forget about Divine Favor and Divine Power. Those Community Chest and Chance bonuses really add up.

  • Use Holy Smite when an opponent is low on cash to force him to sell houses or mortgage property.

  • Use Divine Intervention to force a lucky opponent to reroll if he escapes landing on your improved properties. Or use it on yourself to avoid landing on an opponent’s improved property.

  • Place Glyphs of Warding on your improved properties to increase the chances of your opponents landing there. Or offer to place a glyph on an opponent’s property in exchange for a fee.


Thief

  • Max out Rob Bank early in the game. Traverse the board as quickly as possible to pass GO often, for more chances to line your pockets and gain EP.

  • Do not improve Steal until later in the game, when improved properties become more common.

  • Do not overuse Sneak, especially early in the game when there are few harmful squares. It will slow your movement to a crawl and stunt your EP growth. Instead, use Sneak later in the game to land on opponents’ improved properties without paying rent, then Steal from them.

  • Take advantage of several opponents in a cluster within six squares ahead of you. Sneak, then Backstab and Pick Pockets each one as you pass. Since you can Backstab and Pick Pockets in either order, consider the pros and cons of each. Pick Pockets followed by Backstab might run the opponent out of cash and force him to sell houses or mortgage property, but runs the risk of going to jail before earning the Backstab EP. The other order earns a safe EP and does guaranteed damage, but may result in less money from Pick Pockets if the opponent is low on cash.

  • When on Just Visiting, release characters in jail using Open Locks, then pick their pockets.

  • Don’t forget to “come out of sneak” when landing on desirable properties such as Free Parking and GO.